History Of Brighton And Environs - Online Book

From The Earliest Known Period To The Present Time.

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118
Mr Charles Fleet, entitled '•' Tales and Sketches for Fireside Heading," and the following remarkable instance of longevity connected with his family appeared in the Brighton Herald, of November 26th, 1831:—"There are now living four sons and three daughters of the late Mr Henry Martin, of Eingmer, whose united ages amount to 500 years, and all in the enjoyment of perfect health."
In order to show the enthusiasm with which the subject of our memoir entered into matters relative to hunting, the following anecdote may be mentioned, —" On riding past a cottage in the parish, he was called to account by the house-wife in consequence of her not being able to obtain the weekly grist at the mill, and he gave the following laconic answer, 'Odd, zounds, dame! how can you expect it, for there hasn't been sufficient wind this week to grind meal enough for the puppies.' " He died January 12th, 1798, in his 84th year. One of his sons alluded to hunted with and capped for the Brighton Harriers for nearly a quarter of a century, and died November 23rd, 1846, in his 85th year.
It may here be mentioned—as being somewhat re­markable,—that there has been six or seven, probably more of this family of the same name,—eldest sons of eldest sons, —for some generations. It may be also stated that the village of Eingmer is particularly healthy, and many instances of the longevity of its inhabitants are recorded: an inscription can be seen near the sun-dial in the Church-yard to the memory of Elizabeth Imms, who attained to the great age of 102 years.
The arrangements for the premises, before alluded to, were not carried out, in consequence of a communication from the War Office received a short time afterwards, to the effect that on a re-consideration of the application, they were disposed to let the Barrack property for the purposes of the Hunt; matters were consequently arranged, and the kennels, &c, erected, the hounds again taking up
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