THE HISTORY OF EAST GRINSTEAD - Online Book

The rise and progress of the town and the history of its institutions & people.

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ITS MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT.                        47
where a monument was afterwards erected to his memory by order of the King of France. He was a pleasing poet, remarkable for his skill in versification, though many of his pieces border on the indecent.
1701,  Nov. 24th. Lyonell, Earl of Orrery, and John Conyers.
1702,  July 17th. John Conyers and John Toke, of Godinton, Kent.
John Toke was born in 1671, and married Susannah, daughter of Rev. Daniel Miles, D.D., of Crutched Friars, London. He died in 1746 and was connected by marriage with the Paynes of East Grinstead, the wife of Edward Payne, already referred to, being Miss Elizabeth Toke, of Godinton.
1705, May 11th. John Conyers and John Toke. 1708, May 5th. Richard Lumley and Henry Campion.
Henry Campion, of Combwell Priory, Kent, was the first of the name to occupy the Danny Estate at Hurst-pierpoint. This property had been for many years in the possession of the Courthope family, and it came to the Campions when this Member for East Grinstead married Barbara, daughter and sole heiress of Peter Courthope.
John Conyers was this time a defeated candidate, and he petitioned Parliament that he had a majority of votes and ought to have been returned, but the admitting of " double voices for one and the same burgage-hold," and permitting others to vote who had no right, and by threats and other undue practices, Henry Campion, he alleged, was returned. Parliament decided to have the matter threshed out at the bar of the House, but before it came on for hearing John Conyers withdrew his petition.
1710, Oct. 7th. John Conyers and Leonard Gale.
Leonard Gale was of humble origin, but rose to become a very wealthy man and M.P. for East Grinstead. He was the grandson of a blacksmith at Sevenoaks, and his father managed to save up enough money to start a forge at Tinsley, in Worth, where, in the flourishing days of
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