THE HISTORY OF EAST GRINSTEAD - Online Book

The rise and progress of the town and the history of its institutions & people.

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148                    HISTORY OF EAST GRINSTEAD.
John Batchelar's account book, he apparently looking after the agricultural work at that time and James dealing with the coaching:—
Janry. the 9, 1764. Then A Greed with John Hills to do all ye work in the hop Garding att the Motes as the year before for Six pounds 6s.
The hop garden disappeared many years ago. It is clear that Batchelar kept a good supply of horses before this date, for his own records, kindly placed in my hands by his descendant, Mr. George Batchelar, of Lingfield, show that in 1743 £76 was paid for oats at home, but in 1764 this item had risen to £148. 19s. 9d. for the year, the price at this time ranging from 13s. 6d. to 17s. per quarter. The family then occupied not only Moats, but also Lunnenden (now Lullenden) Farm, while they also owned the Anchor at Croydon and Stumps and Gates Farms, in the parish of Lingfield, then held of the Manor of Imberhorne. On July 21st, 1817, James, the then owner, cut 33 oak trees on Gates Farm and sold them to Mr. John Stenning for £150, handing over to Mr. George Bankin, jun., "for his part for the Lord of the Manor," £70. Mr. Bankin was a well-known solicitor in East Grinstead and died on February 11th, 1847, aged 75. Mr. George Batchelar's grandfather, James, and his three brothers were all born at the Dorset Arms, East Grinstead. A sister, Mary, married a clergy­man named Blagden, and an oil painting still exists of her and her husband. The James of coaching fame died about 1763. His brother John continued to drive the coach and the widow carried on the business for some years; indeed, she did not die until 1817. The property passed to her son James and he sold Stumps and Gates Farms to a Mr. Grange, who amalgamated them under the one name of The Grange, after his own patronymic, and the estate has perpetuated the fact of his brief ownership ever since. The property was after­wards sold to Mr. St. George and it has since passed through the hands of the Dumelope, Hastie, Yatman, Budd and Hubbard families, and is now owned by Mr. Reeve.
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