THE HISTORY OF EAST GRINSTEAD - Online Book

The rise and progress of the town and the history of its institutions & people.

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150                    HlSTORY OE EAST GRlNSTEAt).
Occasionally his men gave him trouble, for we find on—
Aug. 17, 1750. Crissmas Kilner lost a tosing up att London of my money = 14s. 6d.
Dec. 25, 1754. Crismas Kilner pd. me short 9s.
Judging from his name he had possibly been celebrating his birthday.
Ap. 23, 1755. Crismas Kilner pd. me short 14s.
Some of these men were, no doubt, agricultural labourers and not all engaged solely in the coaching business. His general cartage work entailed other expenses, as this entry shows :—
Nov. 3, 1754. Gave Mr. Harman and his wife one ginney for to go through his ground with my waggons from the Mays wood till one month after Lady Day next.
The business was, no doubt, a profitable one and opposi­tion soon sprang up. J. Tubb and S. Brawne started, on June 7th, 1762, a "new Flying Machine, hung on steel springs, very neat and commodious," from the Golden Cross, at Charing Cross, via East Grinstead to Brighton. This vehicle did the down journey on Mondays, Wednes­days and Fridays, and the up on the alternate days. The fares were the same as Batchelar's, who, in order to cope with this interference with his old custom, started " a new large Flying Chariot, with a box and four horses to carry two Passengers only, except three should desire to go together." But the new-comers still drew his patrons away, so Batchelar lowered his prices. This so irritated Tubb that he rushed into print, and in the Lewes Journal of November, 1762, then the only paper published in the County of Sussex and now known as the Sussex Advertiser, appeared a notice in which he said:—
Gentlemen, Ladies, and others, are desired to look narrowly into the Meanness and Design of the other Flying Machine to Lewes and Brighthelmston, in lowering his prices, whether 'tis thro' conscience or an endeavour to suppress me. If the former is the case, think how you have been used for a great number of years, when he engrossed the whole to himself, and kept you two days upon the road, going fifty miles. If the latter, and he should be lucky enough to succeed in it, judge whether he wont return to his old prices, when you cannot help yourselves, and use you as formerly. As I have then, been the remover
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