KIPLING'S SUSSEX - online book

An illustrated descriptive guide, to the places mentioned in
the writings of Rudyard Kipling.

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A VISIT TO LEWES                  167
built of square flints, and has a Norman round tower. Among the monuments in the church is one to a member of the Pelham family, who resisted a French attack upon Seaford in 1545.
St. Anne's, a Transitional building, has a fine Norman doorway and font. In the churchyard is the tomb of Mark Antony Lower, a Sussex historian. " The pulpit is a rejuvenated specimen of Jacobean wood-carving, by no means an unin­teresting piece of work. It was the gift—if not the handiwork also—of a certain Herbert Springett, one of the family of that name which flourished for a space at Broyle Place, Ringmer. An incised inscription tells us,
" HAR . BAR . SPRING AT . GEN . TEL .- MAN . MADE . THIS . PULPIT . IN . THE . YEARE . OF . OUR . LORD .
l620."
It will be recalled that the builder in Kipling's story, " The Wrong Thing," is called Ralph Springett. He was a man who did not believe in doing things in a hurry, and when he built he built for the ages. No two feet concrete founda­tions and jerry-built houses for him ! If you ask a Sussex man why he ploughs so deeply, or why he goes down five feet for his concrete foundation, he will reply in a phrase which is commonly in use
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