Smuggling & Smugglers in Sussex - online book

An Account of a notorious Smuggling gang in the early 18th Century

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SUSSEX SMUGGLERS.                                239
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reports and papers laid before your Honours, observed unto you, that in the latter end of the last warr, and the beginning of the last peace, wool used to be shipped off from thence and from other parts of that county by great numbers of packes weekly, there are not now many visible signs of any quantities being transported. But for fine goods, as they call them (viz., silks, lace, &c), I am well assured that trade goes on through both counties, though not in such vast quantities as have been formerly, brought in—I mean in those days when (as a gentleman of estate in one of the counties has, within this twelve months, told me) he had been att once, besides at other times, at the loading of a wagon with silks, lace, &c, till six oxen could hardly move it out of the place : I doe not think that the trade is now so carried on as 'twas then. Therefore, upon considera­tion of the whole matter, since your Honours are of opinion that it is for her Majestie's service to lessen the charge, I humbly propose:—That whereas there are now, for the security of those coasts, fifty officers appointed from the Isle of Sheppy, in Kent, to Ensworth, in Hampshire, which is coastwise more than two hundred miles, att 60li. per annum, with an allowance to each of them of 30li per annum for a servant and horse, to assist them upon their duty in the night, the whole amounting to about 4500li. per annum, including the old sallary of the port-officers, &c, my opinion, upon consideration as aforesaid, is, if your Honours shall approve thereof, that the said allowance of 30li. to each of them, for a servant and one horse as aforesaid, may be taken off, which will completely reduce one-third part of the whole, and leave it then at about 3000li. per annum ; and for some kind of supply in their nightly duty, instead of their
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